Oracle sun ray 3i как монитор
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Oracle sun ray 3i как монитор

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Oracle sun ray 3i как монитор

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This chapter describes how to administer two different types of monitor configurations that Sun Ray Software supports: multi-monitor and multihead groups.

A multi-monitor configuration supports multiple monitors connected to the dual video connectors on a Sun Ray 2FS or Sun Ray 3 Plus Client.

A multihead group configuration enables you to merge and control multiple Sun Ray Clients, referred to in this context as heads, and their screens using a single keyboard and mouse attached to a primary client.

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11.9. Server and Client Authentication Troubleshooting Home 12.1. Multi-Monitor

Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Legal Notices

Oracle sun ray 3i как монитор

This section describes the multi-monitor support for the Sun Ray 2FS and Sun Ray 3 Plus Clients with dual video connectors. Figure 9.1, “Multi-monitor Example” shows a Sun Ray 3 Plus Client using the multi-monitor feature and the Windows connector.

Figure 9.1. Multi-monitor Example

A figure showing a Sun Ray 3 Plus Client and two monitors showing the multi-monitor feature.

The multi-monitor support is provided by the X Resize, Rotate, and Reflect (RandR) 1.2 extension, which provides a way to use the multiple monitors as one screen. Features include:

  • Configuration changes can be applied dynamically to a session.
  • Application windows are aware of monitor boundaries to avoid placement issues.
  • No size restrictions. Hotdesking is supported to other clients with different monitor resolutions, whether they are smaller or larger.

The RandR 1.2 support is provided with the default Xserver, Xnewt, which is automatically installed and configured with the Sun Ray Software. The most optimal multi-monitor configuration is applied automatically when a Sun Ray Client sessions starts, unless the utxconfig -r command is used to set the DIMENSIONS parameter. In that case, the utxconfig value will be used to size the screen.

You can use the xrandr command to specifically configure a client’s multi-monitor configuration.

To use the enhanced multi-monitor support on Sun Ray 2FS and Sun Ray 3 Plus Clients running Linux, you must install RandR 1.2 on the Linux Sun Ray server. See the Installation and Configuration Guide for details.

9.1.1. Hotdesking

The multi-monitor configuration is preserved with hotdesking. If the new client’s monitor configuration or resolution is different, the previous configuration is used as best as possible. You must use the xrandr command in a terminal window to change the multi-monitor configuration to reflect the new client. Using the -auto option to the xrandr command will automatically adjust the configuration of the particular Outputs to their preferred sizing.

The gnome-display-properties GUI monitor configuration tool should not be used on Solaris or Oracle Linux. Using this tool may adversely affect the client’s RandR 1.2 configuration.

9.1.2. Example xrandr Commands

This section describes a scenario about hotdesking a session from one Sun Ray client with a single monitor to another client with dual monitors. This example shows how to use the xrandr command to view and manage a multi-monitor configuration. For more details, refer to the xrandr man page.

Issuing the xrandr command without any options shows a client’s current multi-monitor configuration. For example, here is the xrandr output for a session created on a client with one monitor displaying at 1280×1024 resolution:

% xrandr Screen 0: minimum 640 x 480, current 1280 x 1024, maximum 10240 x 10240 DVI1 connected 1280x1024+0+0 (normal left inverted right) 361mm x 288mm 1280x1024 0.0*+ 3840x2400 0.0 3200x2400 0.0 2560x2048 0.0 2560x1600 0.0 2560x1440 0.0 2048x1536 0.0 2048x1152 0.0 1920x1200 0.0 1920x1080 0.0 1680x1050 0.0 1600x1200 0.0 1600x1024 0.0 1600x900 0.0 1440x900 0.0 1400x1050 0.0 1368x768 0.0 1280x960 0.0 1280x800 0.0 1280x720 0.0 1152x900 0.0 1024x768 0.0 800x600 0.0 640x480 0.0

In this output, the Screen line provides the current overall screen resolution (1280×1024) and the available maximum resolution (10240×10240). There is a single Output named DVI1 that shows a 1280×1024 monitor connected to the client’s DVI port (or the first DVI port on a dual-DVI client). All dimensions available for this Output are listed, although many of them may not be possible on this particular monitor. The current mode is indicated by a ‘*’ and the preferred mode indicated with a ‘+’.

After hotdesking to a dual-monitor client, the client’s Screen configuration does not change, but the RandR information is updated to reflect preferred modes. For example, hotdesking to a client with 1600×1200 and 1920×1200 monitors would show the following xrandr output:

% xrandr Screen 0: minimum 640 x 480, current 1280 x 1024, maximum 10240 x 10240 DVI1 connected 1280x1024+0+0 (normal left inverted right) 451mm x 338mm 1600x1200 0.0 + 3840x2400 0.0 3200x2400 0.0 2560x2048 0.0 2560x1600 0.0 2560x1440 0.0 2048x1536 0.0 2048x1152 0.0 1920x1200 0.0 1920x1080 0.0 1680x1050 0.0 1600x1024 0.0 1600x900 0.0 1440x900 0.0 1400x1050 0.0 1368x768 0.0 1280x1024 0.0* 1280x960 0.0 1280x800 0.0 1280x720 0.0 1152x900 0.0 1024x768 0.0 800x600 0.0 640x480 0.0 DVI2 connected (normal left inverted right) 1920x1200 0.0 + 3840x2400 0.0 3200x2400 0.0 2560x2048 0.0 2560x1600 0.0 2560x1440 0.0 2048x1536 0.0 2048x1152 0.0 1920x1080 0.0 1680x1050 0.0 1600x1200 0.0 1600x1024 0.0 1600x900 0.0 1440x900 0.0 1400x1050 0.0 1368x768 0.0 1280x1024 0.0 1280x960 0.0 1280x800 0.0 1280x720 0.0 1152x900 0.0 1024x768 0.0 800x600 0.0 640x480 0.0

For this new client, two Outputs are listed, DVI1 and DVI2. Although DVI2 is «connected,» it is not configured with a current mode. Both Outputs have their preferred modes indicated with a ‘+’, but DVI1 still has 1280×1024 as its current mode.

To reconfigure this Screen with the preferred modes for both DVI1 and DVI2, and to preserve the contiguous left to right positioning that the client uses, you could use the following xrandr command:

% xrandr --mode DVI1 --auto --output DVI2 --auto --right-of DVI1

Here is the new multi-monitor configuration, with DVI1 at 1600×1200 resolution, DVI2 at 1920×1200 resolution, and DVI2 starting at 1600,0 on the screen:

% xrandr Screen 0: minimum 640 x 480, current 3520 x 1200, maximum 10240 x 10240 DVI1 connected 16xxx1200+0+0 (normal left inverted right) 451mm x 338mm 1600x1200 0.0*+ 3840x2400 0.0 3200x2400 0.0 2560x2048 0.0 2560x1600 0.0 2560x1440 0.0 2048x1536 0.0 2048x1152 0.0 1920x1200 0.0 1920x1080 0.0 1680x1050 0.0 1600x1024 0.0 1600x900 0.0 1440x900 0.0 1400x1050 0.0 1368x768 0.0 1280x1024 0.0 1280x960 0.0 1280x800 0.0 1280x720 0.0 1152x900 0.0 1024x768 0.0 800x600 0.0 640x480 0.0 DVI2 connected 1920x1200+1600+0 (normal left inverted right) 541mm x 338mm 1920x1200 0.0*+ 3840x2400 0.0 3200x2400 0.0 2560x2048 0.0 2560x1600 0.0 2560x1440 0.0 2048x1536 0.0 2048x1152 0.0 1920x1080 0.0 1680x1050 0.0 1600x1200 0.0 1600x1024 0.0 1600x900 0.0 1440x900 0.0 1400x1050 0.0 1368x768 0.0 1280x1024 0.0 1280x960 0.0 1280x800 0.0 1280x720 0.0 1152x900 0.0 1024x768 0.0 800x600 0.0 640x480 0.0

Copyright © 2011, 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Legal Notices

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Chapter 9. Multiple Monitor Configurations Home 9.2. Multihead

Oracle sun ray 3i как монитор

This chapter provides a list of typical procedures when using a Sun Ray Client. To start a session on a Sun Ray Client once it is properly configured, all you need to do is power on the Sun Ray client, log in after it boots, and wait for the desktop to display.

10.2.1. How to Change Sun Ray Client Settings (Sun Ray Settings GUI)

The Sun Ray Settings GUI enables you to view and change the settings for a Sun Ray Client that you are currently logged into. The utset command provides a non-GUI mechanism for reporting and modifying Sun Ray Client settings. For details, refer to the utset man page.

  1. Press the Settings hot key or run the utsettings command. The default Settings hot key combination is Shift-Props, but this assignment can be reconfigured as described in Section 10.10, “Configuring the Utility Hot Keys”. The Sun Ray Settings GUI is displayed, as shown in Figure 10.1, “Sun Ray Settings GUI”.

Figure 10.1. Sun Ray Settings GUI

Screenshot showing the Sun Ray Settings GUI (utsettings).

  • If the window was launched by the Settings hot key, press the hot key again or apply the window manager’s close action to that window.
  • If the window was launched by invoking utsettings directly, apply the window manager’s close action to that window.

10.2.2. How to Redirect a Sun Ray Client Session

A Sun Ray Client session is redirected to the appropriate Sun Ray server based on the following situations:

  • Failover Group redirection occurs after token insertion.
  • Regional Hotdesking redirection (if configured) occurs after token or user identification and before user authentication.

To manually redirect a session to a different server, use the utselect graphical user interface (GUI) or the utswitch command.

10.2.2.1. How to Manually Redirect to a Different Sun Ray Server (utselect)
  • From a shell window on the Sun Ray Client, type the following command:
% utselect

The selections in the window are sorted in order of the most current to least current active sessions for the token ID.

As shown in Figure 10.2, “Server Selection (utselect) GUI”, the Server column lists the servers accessible from the Sun Ray Client. The Session column reports the DISPLAY variable X session number on the server if one exists. In the Status column, Up indicates that the server is available. The first server in the list is selected by default. Select a server from the list or type the name of a server in the Enter server field. If a server without an existing session is selected, a new session is created on that server.

Figure 10.2. Server Selection (utselect) GUI

This screen enables the user to select a server in a failover group.

10.2.3. How to Manually Redirect to a Different Sun Ray Server (utswitch)

  • In a shell window on the Sun Ray Client, type the following command:
% utswitch -h host 

where host is the host name or IP address of the Sun Ray server to which the selected client is redirected.

10.2.4. How to List Available Hosts

  • In a shell window on the Sun Ray Client, type the following command:
% utswitch -l

Hosts within the current server group that are available to the client are listed.

10.2.5. How to Disconnect a Sun Ray Client Session

NSCM and RHA sessions are disconnected if the screen lock idle time interval is exceeded. See Chapter 6, Hotdesking for details.

You can disconnect a client session through any of the following methods:

  • Lock the session through the current desktop manager. For example, in the Java Desktop System, choose Launch->Lock Screen.
  • Type the following command:
% /opt/SUNWut/bin/utdetach

The hot key combination does not work with a full-screen Windows session.

  • Connect to your session through another client, either by inserting your smart card and authenticating to RHA or by logging in through NSCM.

10.2.6. How to Terminate a Sun Ray Client Session

To terminate the current session and the current X server process, perform one of the following actions:

  • Log out from your current desktop session.
  • Press the key combination Ctrl-Alt-Bksp-Bksp.

A momentary delay might occur before the session terminates.

Use Ctrl-Alt-Bksp-Bksp only for emergencies when you are unable to log out from the desktop. When using this method, applications will not have the opportunity to exit properly and save data, and some application data corruption might result.

10.2.7. How to Power Cycle a Sun Ray Client

To power cycle a Sun Ray Client with a hard reset:

  • Disconnect and then reconnect the power cord.
  • Press the power button if one is available.

To power cycle a Sun Ray Client with a soft reset, press Ctrl-Power or Stop-A.

The Power key at the right side of the top row of a Sun Type 6 or Type 7 keyboard has a crescent moon icon. Therefore, the soft reset key sequence is often called Ctrl-Moon.

10.2.8. How to Enable or Disable XRender

Sun Ray Software includes the Xserver process, Xnewt, as the default Xserver. Xnewt also includes the capability to use the X Rendering Extension (Render), which allows applications on a client to use a rendering model based on Porter-Duff compositing. XRender is enabled by default because many new X applications require XRender to improve performance or to even function properly.

However, some applications use of XRender may conflict with optimizations in the Sun Ray protocol and create an increase in both CPU loading and network bandwidth consumption. In these instances, the applications may see a performance benefit by disabling the XRender extension.

If Sun Ray Clients experience performance degradation with a particular application, use the following procedure to disable XRender.

After enabling or disabling XRender, you must restart your current Sun Ray session (Ctrl-Alt-Bksp-Bksp) for the change to take affect. Or, you can log out from your current session and log back in.

To disable XRender on a client, type the following command:

% utxconfig -n off

To enable XRender on a client, type the following command:

% utxconfig -n on

10.2.9. How to Disable Screen Blanking on a Sun Ray Client

There may be times when you do not want your Sun Ray Client in power saving mode, during which the screen goes blank after a specific period of nonuse.

Power management is a feature of the Sun Ray Software and it is enabled by default. There are a couple of ways to disable power saving mode.

To Disable Power Saving Mode.

At the desktop environment level,

Refer to your desktop documentation about how to disable the power management feature or the screensaver feature.

Here are some examples:

  • Use the xset command.
  • For Solaris, make sure that xscreensaver (JDS) or dtsession (CDE) is disabled or configured to not blank or lock the screen. If active, xscreensaver overrides any settings you have made using the xset command. See the xscreensaver (1) man page for details.
  • For Linux, make sure that gnome-screensaver is disabled or configured to not blank or lock the screen. See the gnome-screensaver-command (1) man page for details.

From the Sun Ray Client level,

Set the Advanced->Video->Blanking parameter to 0 in the Configuration GUI, if enabled. For more details, see Section 11.5, “How to Modify a Sun Ray Client’s Local Configuration (Configuration GUI)”.

10.2.10. How to Modify Screen Resolutions

You can modify your client’s screen resolution settings by invoking the utsettings command.

Any resolution selection made within a session remains effective whenever the session is displayed on that particular Sun Ray Client. The selection is not lost if the unit goes into power-save mode or is power-cycled; however, the resolution settings selected through the utsettings command apply only to the client where the command is run.

When you move to another Sun Ray Client, the resolution settings do not accompany you to the new client, but the settings remain effective for your session on the original client if you return to the session through hotdesking.

If the session is associated with a personal mobile token, such as a smart card or an NSCM credential, a message displays offering to make the selected timing permanent. If you accept that offer, then the timing is retained and reused on your subsequent personal mobile token sessions on the same client.

In addition, the administrator can use the utresadm command to arrange for particular monitor timing to be used in the following situations:

  • Whenever a specific token is presented on a specific client
  • On a specific client regardless of the token that is presented at the client
  • On all clients regardless of the token that is presented at the client

Any conflict among settings is resolved in favor of the most specific configuration rule. That is, a configuration record for a specific token at a specific Sun Ray Client takes precedence over a record for any token at that specific client, and a configuration record for any token at a specific client takes precedence over a record for any token at any client.

For further details, see the utsettings and utresadm man pages.

Copyright © 2011, 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Legal Notices

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10.1. Sun Ray Client Hot Keys Home 10.3. Sun Ray Client Boot Process

Oracle sun ray 3i как монитор

This chapter describes how to use the Sun Management Center software to monitor the Sun Ray System. Installation instructions for the Sun Management Center are located in Installing the SunMC Software of the Sun Ray System Software 4.0 Installation and Configuration Guide .

Sun Management Center (SunMC) Software Features

The Sun Management Center software monitors managed objects in the Sun Ray system. A managed object is any object that can be monitored. Sun Ray nodes contain many managed objects. The Create Topology Object dialog box enables you to create a Sun Ray node. If the Sun Ray packages are installed when you create a Sun Ray node, the following managed objects are created by default:

Each managed object is monitored separately and has independent alarm settings.

For example, in a failover configuration, the entire group as well as any part of the group can be monitored—each server and its load, each interconnect, and each DTU. Sun Management Center software also monitors Sun Ray Server Software daemons that:

After you set an alarm, the Sun Management Center software notifies you when your specified parameter value has been reached. For example, you might want to track the number of DTUs on a server so that you can monitor possible overload scenarios. Other alarms can be set to notify you when a server, interconnect, or DTU goes down or when a daemon is not running.

The three Sun Management Center components (TABLE 8-1) can be installed on three separate machines.

TABLE 8-1 Three Components of Sun Management Center Software

Enables you to set and view alarms and to request system information. Requests can be automated or on demand.

Processes requests and passes them on to the appropriate agent. The agent returns the requested information to the server, which then forwards it to the console.

Monitor the system. Agents return the requested information to the server. These agents, based on SNMP ( Simple Network Management Protocol), monitor the status of the managed object (server, interface, or DTU).

Sun Ray system monitoring consists of a set of packages, which are installed as part of Sun Ray Server Software. If you run the Sun Management Center on a non-Sun Ray server, you must add some packages that contain localized messages and icons to the Sun Management Center monitoring server.

This feature interfaces with the Sun Management Center software using SNMP. For information on additional monitoring programs that interact with Sun Management Center software, see Using Other Monitoring Programs.

Additional Sun Management Center Modules

There are other useful Sun Management Center modules available to monitor processes and help tune your Sun Ray system. For example, the Health Monitor module monitors resources on the Sun Ray server so you know when to add memory, swap space, or additional CPUs. The Sun Management Center Process Monitoring module helps identify runaway processes and limit multimedia applications.

Setting Up the Monitoring Environment

After installing the Sun Management Center software, you need to set up your monitoring environment. A default administrative domain is automatically created for you based on the Sun Management Center server component. You need to set a home administrative domain. This domain is displayed whenever the console is started. Next, create the hierarchy of the system you want to monitor. This can be done manually by adding nodes to the administrative domain or by using the Discovery Manager.

To Set Up the Monitoring Environment

1. After installing the Sun Management Center software, start the console on the server that has the console component installed:

# /opt/SUNWsymon/sbin/es-start -c & 

The login screen is displayed.

2. Enter your user name and password.

Specify the Sun Management Center server.

The Sun Management Center window is displayed. If this is your first time using the SunMC console, the Set Home Domain window is also displayed.

4. In the Set Home Domain window, highlight the appropriate domain and click Go To.

The panels in the Sun Management Center window are populated.

5. Click Close to dismiss the Set Home Domain window.

To Create an Object

1. Expand the Sun Management Center Domains list.

2. Select the domain you plan to add an object to.

The selected domain is displayed.

3. Select Edit -> Create an Object.

The Create Topology Object pop-up window is displayed.

4. On the Node page, enter a Node Label and Description. Then enter the Hostname (server name), IP Address, and Port for the Sun Ray server.

The port entered here must be the same port you configured (entered) during the installation of the Sun Management Center.

Setting Alarms

Alarms are used to notify you when errors occur or your performance needs to be tuned. Alarms are triggered (tripped) if:


    A server goes down.

These alarms are set by default, but you can change them. Base a tuning alarm on the number of active sessions on each server in a failover group to determine if one of the servers is overloaded. You set the thresholds that trigger this type of alarm.

To Set an Alarm

1. After creating an object, bring up the Details window of the object.

FIGURE 8-1 Sun Management Center Details Window

2. Double-click, for example, Failover Group in the left panel.

3. Right-click the value portion (Status) of the table row.

FIGURE 8-2 Example Using the Failover Group Panel

A pop-up menu is displayed.

4. Select Attribute Editor.

The Attribute Editor window for that table entry is displayed.

5. Select the Alarms tab (See FIGURE 8-3.)

The possible alarm values are:

6. Supply an appropriate number for the type of alarm that you choose to monitor.

In this example, the Alert Threshold alarm is set at greater than 1 to notify you when that server in the failover group is down.

7. Click the Apply button to save the value of the alarm and continue setting other values in the Attribute Editor

8. Click the OK button, which saves the value of the alarm and closes the window.

As soon as you set an alarm it takes effect.

9. Select the Actions tab and enter an action to perform.

Here you can also specify an action such as sending email or running a script for each alarm.

10. Select the Refresh tab to set the number of seconds between pollings.

The default value is 300 seconds (5 minutes).

11. Select the History tab to view information about the log file that records monitored values.

FIGURE 8-3 Alarm Window

If an alarm is tripped, a critical alarm displays as red, an alert alarm displays as yellow, and a caution displays as blue (see FIGURE 8-4).

To Start Monitoring

1. Start the Sun Management Center software:

# /opt/SUNWsymon/sbin/es-start -c & 

A window for the Default domain is displayed.

2. Log in to the Sun management Center server.

3. Double-click the server in either panel.

The server Details window is displayed.

4. Expand the hierarchy in the left or right panel until it displays the level you want.

FIGURE 8-4 Details Window With Alarms

This console Details window shows the hierarchical details of your system. You can immediately see if any alarms have been tripped. An alarm’s area and type appear in the left panel as a colored circle with a bar. The Alert alarm also shows up on the title bar by the server node name and at the Operating System, Sun Ray, and Failover Group levels. Double-clicking the area where an alarm icon is present updates the right panel with the detailed information. If you position the mouse pointer over one of the colored circles in either panel, a pop-up window is displayed detailing the alarm information.

If you click the Alarms tab in the Details window, a window is displayed that lists a summary of all the current alarms. When you stop the Sun Ray services (daemons), the alarms display as shown in FIGURE 8-5.

FIGURE 8-5 Alarm Summary Window

The total number of alarms set for the current server object is displayed at the top of the alarm summary window. Critical alarms (red), alert alarms (yellow), and caution alarms (blue) that are tripped are listed below. Details and comments are displayed in the Message column.

Some cells in the table respond to a mouse-over event by displaying a pop-up window called a Tool Tip window . This window shows the current status and when it last changed, plus the type of alarm, its value, and when it occurred or when the last alarm was cleared. The Tool Tip time can also be the last time the agent was restarted. For example, on the Sun Ray System panel, a Tool Tip for Up Time (1/100ths sec.) would be:

Clear. Up Time (1/100th sec.) OK Status changed Mar. 6, 15:23:55.

indicating that the server was restarted and the alarm cleared on March 6 at 15:23:55. Similar information is provided for Active Sessions, Desktops, Users, and Total Sessions.

Setting Monitoring Guidelines

There are five managed objects that you can monitor:


    Sun Ray System—Describes the Sun Ray server and load information

Sun Ray System Panel

The Sun Ray System panel displays an overview of your Sun Ray system. From this window you can set specific alarms to monitor the server and its load.

To Display the Sun Ray System Panel

Double-click the Sun Ray System icon in the left panel.

The Operating System/Sun Ray/ Sun Ray System panel is populated.

FIGURE 8-6 Sun Ray System Panel

To Refresh the Sun Ray System Panel

Click the refresh button (circular arrow in the upper right corner).

The entire system panel is refreshed.

The Up Time, session, DTU (desktop), and user information is refreshed periodically based on the number of seconds you set in the Attribute Editor. However, the console is updated only every five minutes unless an alarm occurs. The number of seconds set in the Attribute Editor only changes how soon an alarm is triggered.

Tip — Do not set the seconds to less than 60. The load interferes with the Sun Ray server performance.

In this panel, you set alarms to monitor the status of the server; how many sessions, users, or DTUs are active; and how many total sessions exist.

1. Click the Value cell of the Property you want to set an alarm for with the right mouse button.

2. Select Attribute Editor.

3. Click the Alarms tab.

4. Enter a value for each threshold you want to monitor.

TABLE 8-2 Properties on the Sun Ray System Panel

Name of server that was queried. This information is obtained when Sun Ray System is selected or on manual refresh.

This information is obtained when Sun Ray System is selected or on manual refresh.

Up Time (measured in hundredths of a second)

Number of hundredths of a second since the last of all the daemons critical to the Sun Ray server was started. A value of 0 means the server is down and an alarm is tripped. The default refresh rate is 300 seconds (five minutes)

List of version, build, and date of build of Sun Ray Server Software. This information is obtained when Sun Ray System is selected or on manual refresh.

Date Sun Ray Server Software was installed. This information is obtained when Sun Ray System is selected or on manual refresh.

List of Sun-Ray-specific patches. This information is obtained when Sun Ray System is selected or on manual refresh.

Number of sessions based on logged-in sessions with a smart card plugged in, plus sessions for DTUs logged in without smart cards. Set an alarm here to watch for overloading of this server. The default refresh rate is 300 seconds (five minutes).

Number of active and suspended sessions. The default refresh rate is 300 seconds (five minutes).

Number of connected DTUs. The default refresh rate is 300 seconds.

Number of currently active users. When pseudo-tokens are allowed (this is a policy setting for non-smart card users), this number includes DTUs at the login prompt. The default refresh rate is 300 seconds (five minutes).

The policy that has been set. This information is obtained when Sun Ray System is selected or on manual refresh.

Sun Ray Services Panel

The Sun Ray Services panel displays the status of the Sun Ray daemons. If, for example, utauthd is not running, all user sessions are disconnected.

On the Sun Ray Services panel, default alarm values are set for the status of each daemon and the number of instances. Some of the daemons have two instances, corresponding to their two functions: one to listen and one to interact. You can reset them if you want to.

FIGURE 8-7 Sun Ray Services ( daemons) Panel

The Status values are:

The daemon is running.

The daemon is down.

Failover Group Panel

The Failover Group panel displays the topography of your failover group. The panel lists the primary and secondary servers and their status.

FIGURE 8-8 Failover Group Panel

The Status values are:

The server is running.

The server is down (displays a yellow alert).

Interconnect Panel

The Interconnect panel lists all the network interfaces usable by the Sun Ray server.

FIGURE 8-9 Interconnect Panel

The DHCP Table lists the interfaces that are used for the Sun Ray interconnect. Available Addresses lists the number of addresses available for new end users. The alarms that are set here let the system administrator know when the Sun Ray server is running out of addresses to give to users.

The Interface Table lists all the interfaces on the Sun Ray server. The Address is the IP address for the interface. You entered this address as the Net Mask when you first configured your system. The Status values are:

The interface is up.

The interface is down.

To Set an Alarm for Running Out of Addresses

1. Click the Available Addresses cell in the DHCP Table using the right mouse button.

2. Select Attribute Editor.

3. Click the Alarms tab.

4. Enter the number of addresses left when an alarm should be tripped.

Desktops Panel

The Desktops panel is where you can select individual DTUs to monitor. DTUs can be added and deleted from the Monitored Desktops list. In a failover group, you can monitor any desktop from any server. The default polling time is 300 seconds (5 minutes). The Status values are:

The DTU is running.

The DTU is down.

The DTU is displaying the hourglass cursor.

FIGURE 8-10 Desktops Panel

TABLE 8-3 describes the information in each column:

TABLE 8-3 Desktop Information

Ethernet or MAC address of the DTU

Assigned DHCP address of the DTU

1 running, 2 down, and 3 displaying the green hourglass cursor

Number of packets received by the DTU

Number of packets the DTU reported lost

Percentage of packets lost

Optional field; information supplied by system administrator

Optional field; information supplied by system administrator

Server that owns the DTU

The type of DTU: Sun RayP1 (Sun Ray 1), Sun RayP2 (Sun Ray 100), Sun RayP3 (Sun Ray 150), etc.

List of version, build, and build date

To Add a DTU to Be Monitored

1. Click Name using the right mouse button.

A pop-up menu is displayed.

2. Click Add Row.

A pop-up window is displayed.

3. In the Add Row window, enter the MAC address of the DTU you want to monitor in the Name field.

To Delete a DTU to Exclude Monitoring

1. Using the right mouse button, click the cell containing the MAC address.

A pop-up menu is displayed.

2. Click Delete Row.

A pop-up window is displayed.

3. Confirm the deletion by clicking Yes on the pop-up window.

Sample results of polling the Desktops are provided below.

Using Other Monitoring Programs

System administrators using HP OpenViewVPO, Tivoli TMS, or CA Unicenter can also monitor Sun Ray servers. An interoperability interface exists between each of these packages and the Sun Management Center software. These interfaces translate Sun Management Center alarms appropriately so that you are notified when problems arise. These interfaces also enable you to view the server status. Hewlett- Packard provides the interface needed between HP OpenViewVPO and Sun Management Center. Sun provides the interface needed between Sun Management Center and Tivoli TMS or CA Unicenter.

FIGURE 8-11 Example of Interoperability

In FIGURE 8-11, systems B and E must be Solaris SPARC systems; system C can be either a Solaris SPARC or a Solaris x86 system.

Removing the Sun Ray Module from SunMC

The Sun Ray module is uninstalled automatically when the utinstall script uninstalls Sun Ray Server Software. If you are uninstalling the Sun management Center software manually, please remove the Sun Ray module first.

To Remove the Sun Ray Module

To unregister the module on the Sun Ray server, type:

# /opt/SUNWut/sbin/utsunmc -u 

If the SunMC agent is running, utsunmc stops and restarts the Sun Management Center agent software.

To remove the Sun Ray module on the SunMC server, type:

# /opt/SUNWut/lib/utsunmcinstall -u 
Sun Ray Server Software 4.0 Administrator’s Guide for Solaris 820-0411

Copyright © 2007, Sun Microsystems, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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